JOURNAL — Art Pottery RSS



Blue Christmas

Refreshingly aquatic, this vase would bring a bit of the Mediterranean to your Christmas tree.  Made in Italy, it is decidedly Modernist—and yet, thanks to its cuneiform-like hand-impressions, also has an ancient, timeless appeal. See this piece, and many more new acquisitions, in the shop or check-out our on-line store. Click on the picture above […]

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Modern Craft

West German Modernist ceramicist, Rudi Stahl, crafted this glazed stoneware piece—more sculpture than vessel.  Six little “stovepipes,” like a field of mushrooms, reach heavenward and provide a classic, Mid-Century Modern look.  Glazed in variegated  buff and carmel. Come into the shop and see more of our recently-collected pieces—pottery, cufflinks, boxes, and more—or click on the […]

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Reds

On my most recent European buying trip, I bought a very large collection of red West German art pottery—enough to fill a 48″ table! Come into the shop to see the new collection.  One piece makes a wonderful gift.  Several pieces make a bold decorating statement. Besides red pottery, I’ve also bought a lot of […]

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Cobalt Blue

Amongst the cache of ceramics—purchased on my most recent buying trip—is this collection of cobalt blue West German pottery.  Made by Hoy, Scheurich, and others, they make a lovely arrangement of bold, stately color. See these and a lot more pottery in-shop now, or in the on-line store in days to come.

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London Calling – part V

By ceramicist Rudi Stahl, a piece of West German Modernist ceramics.  More sculptural than functional, it would look good in any setting—Modern or  Woody.  Like a field of mushrooms, six little chimneys emerge from the heavy, stoneware base. See this piece and other new items in-shop from 13 December.  This piece should be posted to […]

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London Calling – part III

From Holland, circa 1920, this little Gouda bowl.  Perfect as a wine coaster or bedside “pin tray,” it is decorated with hand-painted flowers and a scrolling wave border.  A lovely combination of color and design. Come into the shop to see this, and other recent acquisitions, after 13 December. More new items tomorrow and in […]

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London Calling – part I

I’m in London at the moment, my last buying trip before Christmas.  Over the next several days, I’ll share some “quick shots” of pieces I’ve acquired. Shown above, a (small) portion of a large collection of Modernist ceramics—mostly West German and Italian.  Many reds, some matte cobalt blue, and a few green pieces round out […]

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Danish Art Nouveau

Though it’s not English, I bought the piece, shown above, from a British collector (a long-time source for goodies in my shop).  It is made by Ipsen, the Danish ceramics workshop, and is dated 1911.  It has the gentle, feminine curves of the Art Nouveau, but is energized with a dripping metallic over-glaze of silver […]

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Sculpture or Vessel?

Normally, it’s a straight-forward matter to decide whether an object is a vase or a piece of sculpture.  Occasionally, however, it’s not quite so simple.  Take the West German piece above, made in the 1960’s by ceramicist Rudi Stahl.  One could put a flower stem (or two) into each little spout.  Would that do the […]

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Art Finds a Way

While borders may change and territories expand and contract, art continue to press on. Art—a fundamental expression of human creativity—is challenged by conflict, sometimes changed by conflict, but rarely killed by conflict. The piece of art pottery, pictured above, was birthed in a time and region of tremendous conflict—and has survived beautifully. Having been made […]

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No White Elephants Here

Legend has it that the King of Siam would present courtiers—specifically annoying or obnoxious ones—with the royal gift of a White Elephant.  Despite the gift’s incredible rarity, the animal was such a burden to sustain that the unpleasant courtier would be ruined financially just trying to keep the animal fed and maintained. Today, the term […]

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George Stubbs: Equine Genius

On this day in 1724, British artist George Stubbs was born in Liverpool to a leather “currier” (finisher) and merchant.  He worked with his father until he was 16, at which point he was apprenticed to a local painter and engraver, a position which didn’t last long—Stubbs did not like the repetitive copying which was […]

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Smoke and Ash

It was just an ordinary day in Pompeii: 24 August 79 AD.  People were going-about their regular business, bustling-along the marble-clad streets and roadways of the ancient Roman city.  Then, without warning, Mons Vesuvius—five miles away—exploded, sending molten rock and poisonous gasses straight up, over 20 miles into the sky. When the dust settled, Pompeii […]

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The Louvre Turns 220

On 10 August 1792, the “Storming of the Tuileries Palace” effectively brought an end to the French monarchy (later restored in 1814).  Louis XVI and his wife, Marie Antoinette, were arrested and locked away—later to be killed. This bloody chapter in French history was followed, exactly one year later, with the official opening of the […]

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