JOURNAL — Mirrors RSS



Saw it Through the Grapevine

Art Nouveau craftsmen—whether they be in England, Austria, Scotland, France or the United States (and whatever they called their local Arts & Crafts movement)—often "recycled" decorative elements from their cultural or national pasts. English artisans often tapped Medieval themes (from literature or heraldry), aesthetic motifs from their ancient past (including Norse or Celtic elements) or significant design styles from the past (though centuries old).  And the hand-crafted nature of Arts & Crafts production leant itself to the rustic work methods of earlier times. The English Arts & Crafts frame, shown above, was made around the year 1900. Nevertheless, it has a style and design of something from the Tudor or Jacobean period, up to 400 years earlier. Even the manner...

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A Reflection on the Jacobean

King James of England and Scotland inherited both of his thrones from women.  He became James VI of Scotland, at 13 months of age, when his mother, Mary Queen of Scots, was forced to abdicate.  Some 36 years later, when Queen Elizabeth of England died without an heir, James became the King of England and […]

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Reflections of Glasgow

I love visiting Scotland.  And I love most things Scots—especially the Scottish Arts & Crafts. Therefore, I’m thrilled to have acquired, from turn-of-the-century Glasgow, a handsome, hand-hammered, brass-framed “looking glass”—embellished with a rich border of stylized, scrolling, sinewy botanicals. The Scots are a hearty lot; life eeked-out on the rocky, windswept land is not for […]

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Science and The Art Nouveau – Part Two

“The God-given natural forms of leaves and flowers must be more perfect and beautiful than any invention of man.” – Augustus Pugin (1812-1852) With great strides being made in the advancement of scientific knowledge, botany was much-studied and better-understood.  Although the compound microscope was a Renaissance invention (thank Galileo), it was not until the 1830’s […]

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Through the Looking Glass

On this day in 1832, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson was born.  He studied and taught mathematics at Oxford, excelled in the new art form, photography, was an Anglican Deacon, and wrote poetry and books—under the pen name, Lewis Carroll. While teaching at Oxford, he befriended a new dean, Henry Liddell, his wife and children. The youngest […]

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Alice's Glass ?

After Lewis Carroll wrote Alice in Wonderland (1865), he wrote a sequel: Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There.  It was published in 1871—some 30 years before this mirror was crafted.  Still I couldn't help thinking, when I found it in Oxford this summer, that some "first generation" reader of the Alice novels might have peered-into this glass.  Now the mirror is stateside, ready to bring it's mystery (if not magic) to some American home.  Click on the photo above to learn more about it.   LEO Design's Greenwich Village store is now permanently closed.  While we contemplate our next shop location, please visit our on-line store which continues to operate  (www.LEOdesignNYC.com). Follow us on Instagram: "leodesignhandsomegifts" Follow us on Facebook: "LEO Design...

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Practical Art

Fresh from England: a nice quality small, round, bevelled mirror with a hand-hammered brass repoussé frame.  In the manner of the Keswick School of Industrial Arts or the Glaswegian (Scottish) aesthetic, this British Arts & Crafts mirror is surrounded with a scrolling, stylized grape vine motif—complete with clusters of fruit and leaves.  Useful as a mirror, it […]

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Butterflies are . . . 25% Off

Tomorrow I make my first truck-run to storage—in Pennsylvania where I’ll begin stashing unsold merchandise until I’ve reinvented.  While I hope to sell as much as possible (during our closing sale), I also realize that I will need good stock to begin the new LEO Design venture—and I’m extra-partial to certain items like this English […]

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Notes From the Road – part IX

I loved this oak-framed, bevelled mirror the minute I found it!  After dragging it through Rush Hour London (on the Tube), I got it back to my hotel where (dang!) it wouldn’t fit into by suitcase.  As a result, I had to drag two (huge) suitcases plus a 1920’s English mirror through Victoria Station and […]

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New English Receipts – part VI

We’ve been sharing some of our newly-acquired items, just brought back from England. Everything is now checked-in, cleaned-up, priced and put-out on display. Please come into the shop to see these new and beautiful items.  In the meantime, we’re sharing a few selected pieces here in our Journal. Shown above, a Scottish Arts & Crafts […]

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The Eleventh Hour of the Eleventh Day of the Eleventh Month

On this day—four or five years ago—I found myself in a London Waitrose supermarket, late in the morning.  At 11 o’clock, precisely, a very serious-sounding manager came over the loudspeaker, asking us shoppers to observe two minutes of silence.  It was my first acquaintance with the rituals of Armistice Day—which commemorates the 1918 end of World […]

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Ivy League

Yesterday’s journal entry about Harvard sets-up today’s entry quite nicely: a different kind of ivy. Shown above, an English Arts & Crafts mirror which we’ve just acquired.  Its bevelled, oval glass is surrounded by a thick quarter-sawn oak frame which has been deeply-carved with a trailing ivy motif.  Perfect over a dresser, in a powder […]

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Greeting August

Let’s welcome August and celebrate one of the month’s birth flowers: The Poppy. Poppies are thought to have originated in the Western Mediterranean and have been cultivated by Western and Central Europeans from about 6,000 BC.  Early on, people recognized the analgesic properties of the plant.  Ancient Egyptian doctors had their patients chew a mouthful […]

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Aesthetically Pleasing

Remind your Dad who’s King of his Castle with this handsome, late-19th Century American Aesthetic Movement mirror, recently-acquired.  While not the most typical of Father Day gifts, it will certainly make a handsome—and useful—addition to your father’s abode. Come see it in-person or click on the photo above to learn more about it. More interesting […]

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Notes From the Road – part III

I continue to travel through New England this week, in-search of “Handsome Gifts”—especially gifts for Father’s Day.  I’ve assembled a collection of impressive mirrors, two of which are shown above.  The front mirror, made during the 1840’s to 1860’s, is crafted of mahogany veneer over a curved “ogee” profile.  The larger mirror, in back, is […]

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. . . Of Them All ?

We end our little tour of antique mirrors with this handsome English Arts & Crafts offering. Copper is hammered with a meandering poppy decoration resulting in a mirror that is functional as well as artful. Poppies—wild flowers from which one can extract a narcotic sedative—are associated with rest or sleep.  In some places, the poppy […]

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. . . Who’s the Fairest . . .

From 1920’s France, an iron-framed Art Deco mirror.  The mirror has a crisp, machine-inspired angularity, with just a little spray of flowers at the top—a small nod to the previous Art Nouveau or Secessionist schools. Imagine this over an Art Deco sideboard, laden with crystal decanters, awaiting Nick and Nora Charles! Please come by the […]

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. . . On the Wall . . .

Like yesterday’s mirror, this one also was made in Victorian England.  It “reflects” a more-formal, more-refined English Arts & Crafts aesthetic. The brass surround is hand-hammered with a lush floral repoussé treatment—the result of hours of a craftsman’s labor.  Perfect for a powder room, in a dining room, or beside the front door (for a […]

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Mirror, Mirror . . .

What a dreary winter we’ve had!  It makes sense that cooped-up New Yorkers would seek to bring more light into their apartments.  For this reason, we sell a lot of lighting fixtures and mirrors—which produce and reflect light—during the Winter and early Spring. Shown above, a hand-carved oak-framed bevelled mirror, crafted in Victorian England. Made […]

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Enter, Art Deco

By the mid 1920’s, with the horrors of The War in the past, the world was ready for a new, fashionable “look.” Streamlined, modern, forward-looking, Art Deco was perfectly-suited to industrial mass production. And it was very popular.  Everything from skyscrapers to toasters to automobiles were designed in the new, “machine age” fashion. Whereas Arts & Crafts […]

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Arts & Crafts, at the End

Yesterday we discussed the origins of the Arts & Crafts movement which flourished—in several countries, under different names—during the late Nineteenth and early Twentieth Centuries.  As pointed out, this period coincided with the rise (in some countries) of a new middle class who now, perhaps for the first time, had disposable income to spend on […]

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