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For Wedding Season

From Japan, a set of six Mid-Century champagne coupes, hand-crafted in smokey crystal with just a hint of purple.  It’s another part of our recently-acquired collection of glassware, now in-shop—and just in-time for the wedding gift-giving season.  Please come into the shop to see the full collection.

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Ice Blue Crystal

Also from Japan, another set of crystal champagne coupes, this time in icey blue.  This set of six would be perfect for hosting—any season of the year.  Nicely-weighted and finished.  We also found the same pattern in  two sizes of wine glasses. Please come into the shop to see them and the rest of our […]

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Bottoms Up!

Travel “Back to the Sixties” with this set of six Mid-Century high balls, decorated with a black and gold “Top Shelf” motif.  Stylish, fancy—and thoroughly Modernist—these tumblers are one set of recently-acquired glassware now in-store.  Please come into the shop to see the full assortment or click on the photo above to learn more about […]

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More Mid-Century

A touch of the ancient joins Mid-Century Modern in this set of six high ball drinks glasses, printed with a pattern of coins and crests.  They’re part of a recently-received shipment of glassware, now in-store. Please come into the shop to see them—and the rest of the shipment—or click on the photo to learn more […]

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Understated Sophistication

In our recent shipment of recently-acquired, vintage glassware, you’ll find the Deutsch Weingläser—German wine glasses—pictured above.  Smoked crystal is rimmed with a ring of platinum to create these Modernist (yet thoroughly classic) wine stems which feel lovely in-the-hand.  They are beautifully sophisticated without being pretentious. Please click on the photo to learn more about them, […]

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Mirrored Modern

Make your Sunday Soirée the talk of the town with this swanky beverage service from the 1960’s.  Mirrored rims fade to clear on the eight high ball glasses which nestle into a chromed carrier.  A mirrored ice bucket and pair of tongs complete the service. Please come into the shop to see this beverage service—or […]

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Modernist “Optic” Amethyst Glass

Another nice set of glasses—part of our new shipment of vintage glassware—is this lot of eight amethyst glass tumblers from the 1960’s.  Bottom-weighted and having a luxurious, heavy hand-feel, they also have a rippled interior design which creates a soft, “optic” effect. Perfect for a glass of red wine. Please come into the shop to […]

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Modern with a Touch of Platinum

From post WWII Germany, a set of six smoked crystal champagne coupes, finished with platinum rims.  Part of a new shipment of glassware now in-store.  Come into the  shop to see them or click on the photo to learn more about them. More new glassware in days to come.

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La Fête Nationale

On this day in 1789, French revolutionaries stormed and captured the 14th century Paris fortress called the Bastille Saint-Antoine.  Long used as a prison by the kings of France, the citadel was a potent symbol of the monarchy’s dominance.  Once captured, its name became a rallying cry for the rag-tag revolutionaries.  To this day, 14 […]

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And, Finally, a Little Italian

We conclude the parade of newly-acquired, Modernist ceramics with a little Italian diversion.  The trio of pieces, shown above, were made for the Italian company Raymor in the 1960’s.  They capture beautifully the Italian’s mastery of line, form, and style—and represent Italian Modernism perfectly. Please come into the shop to see the entire new collection.

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West German, Concluded

The little pitcher, pictured above, has a frothy yellow-orange glaze over a red underglaze and was made by Scheurich in the 1960’s or 1970’s.  It’s part of a large collection of Modernist art pottery just acquired and now in-store. Please stop by the shop to see the entire collection of new pottery. More art pottery […]

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And Even More West German

Our newly-acquired collection of West German art pottery includes the piece above, made by Fohr in the 1960’s or 1970’s.  It’s one of two dozen pieces of (mostly) red (mostly) West German Modernist ceramics recently purchased by LEO Design and now in-store. Please visit the shop to see the entire collection. More art pottery tomorrow. […]

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West German, Continued

The piece above, by Jasba, was made in West Germany in the 1960’s or 1970’s.  It is one of two dozen new pieces of Modernist art pottery recently acquired and now in-store. Come visit the shop to see the entire collection. More new acquisitions tomorrow.

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More West German

Our new collection of West German art pottery continues with the pieces above by Bay and Jasba.  They were made in the post-war 1960’s and 1970’s. Please come into the shop to see the entire new collection.  More new West German pottery in the next few days.

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Red Lava Flows-In

We’ve just acquired a new collection of (mostly) red, (mostly) West German art pottery from the 1960’s and 1970’s.  Two dozen pieces from various post-war ceramics workshops. Shown above are pieces by Scheurich, Jopeko and Gräflich Ortenburg. Please visit the shop to see the entire collection. More of the new collection in days to come. […]

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Architectural Icons

The Empire State Building stands boldly on this new greeting card by artist Dan Durkin. While the collection is not new—we’ve been selling Dan’s cards for a few years—the card shown above was made recently at our special request.  Dan creates the original art work, prints the cards, then hand-applies touches of gouache before delivering […]

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Cards in Another Color

More hand-made greeting cards, printed one-at-a-time in a small Vermont art studio.  The collection above—in red, buff, and white—are great for summer without being nautical. Please come into the shop to see the full range of new, summer-appropriate greeting cards. More new cards tomorrow.

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Summer Greeting Cards

Just in time for summer, I’ve received a delivery of hand-crafted greeting cards, made (one-at-a-time) in a small Vermont art studio.  First the artist hand-carves the design into a linoleum block which is then inked and used to impress the design directly onto the paper. The original designs are fresh and perfect for the season—reminiscent […]

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Independence Day

Happy Fourth of July! LEO Design will be open today from Noon ’til 6:00 pm.  We’d be happy to see you! Shown above, a set of American-made, hand-crafted wooden blocks—decorated with a nautical theme.  Laser cut and printed in non-toxic inks, these blocks show nautical flags, semaphore signaling, morse code signals, letters of the alphabet, […]

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A Fresh New Collection

Perfect for Summer!  We’ve just acquired a collection of West German art pottery—glazed in a fresh, summery turquoise—by Gräflich Ortenburg.  The workshop was founded in the small village of Tambach, central Germany, just after the war in 1946 and closed in 1968.  The pieces above were made in the last years of the company’s existence. […]

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Il Palio di Siena

I’ve only ever been to Siena in the Autumn—well after the annual summer horse races which have helped make the Medieval city famous.   Nevertheless, I couldn’t help being taken with the magnificent, bowl-shaped Piazza del Campo and imagine it packed with spectators, the thunder of horses hooves creating a sense of excitement and danger. […]

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Rubies for July

It’s July and the month’s birthstone is the ruby.  Alas, I am clean-out of rubies—though I did manage to find this handsome pair of ruby enameled cufflinks from the Art Deco period.  The said ruby enameling lies over radiant guilloché work and the whole lot is set into gold-plated mountings.  Not rubies, fair enough, […]

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Still More Cufflinks

Another interesting pair of cufflinks, new to the shop: sterling silver Vietnamese dragons snarling—ready to strike—from their positions, coiled upon your wrists.  Probably from the 1920’s or 1930’s, these cufflinks are unlike any I’ve ever found.  Please click on the photo to learn more about them. More cufflinks tomorrow.

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And More Cufflinks

And yet another beautiful and unusual offering from our newly-acquired collection of vintage cufflinks.  Bold American Art Deco, fashioned in sterling silver, with pistachio and amber enameling over a graphic guilloché pattern.  It doesn’t get more Art Deco than this! Please click on the photo to learn more about this particular pair, visit our on-line […]

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Cufflinks, Continued

Another example from our new collection of beautiful, vintage cufflinks.  This pair is enameled in a refreshing, Mediterranean blue over a swirling, radiant guilloché pattern. Please click on the photo to learn more about them—or visit the shop to see our large collection of beautiful cufflinks. More cufflinks in days to come.

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Just-In: Cufflinks

I’ve just bought a number on nice, new cufflinks—just in time for wedding season. Perhaps a gift for the groom to wear on his special day?  Or a gift from the groom to his groomsmen? This pair has robin’s egg blue enameling over a radiant guilloché design, set into nicely-finished, gold-plated mountings. Please come into […]

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Bon Jour, Bretagne

Bretagne—or “Brittany” as it’s called in English—is a little spit of land that juts off of France’s Northwest coast, into the English Channel, due south of England.  It has a history of being invaded, occupied, and influenced by the various tribes and empires that came along: the Celts, the Romans, the Britons, and the Gauls. […]

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Set Adrift

Henry Hudson was an English explorer who, at different times, worked for English or Dutch merchants, attempting to find them a shorter trade route to Asia.  The elusive “Northwest Passage”—an Arctic Circle seaway which could link Europe and the Orient—was believed to exist, though had not yet been discovered by European seamen.  Henry Hudson made […]

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Glassware, continued

Another liquor service, this time in golden-rich Amber Glass.  Serve port, brandy, or another favorite after-dinner refreshment, in swanky Sixties style.  The set includes the decanter, a glass stopper, and six serving glasses.  It’s part of our recently-acquired collection of glassware—tumblers, rocks glasses, and stems—now in-store and ready for your perusal. Please click on the […]

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And More Glassware…

On this day in 1863, West Virginia was admitted into the Union, making it the  35th U.S. State.  It’s only fitting to feature some newly-acquired glassware made in West Virginia some one hundred years later.  And, of course, West Virginia was the center for some of America’s best Twentieth Century glassware. The liquor service, shown […]

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Glassware, Continued

The heat is on—at least here in New York City!  It’s the perfect time for us to show you more of the interesting glassware, acquired on my most recent buying trip.  It seems I found a lot of novelty glassware (including those shown above).  Printed with stripes, graphics, or botanical motifs, these sets of glasses […]

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M. C. Escher

On this day in 1898, Maurits Cornelius Escher was born in Leeuwarden, capital of Friesland, Northern Netherlands.  Poor Maurits suffered poor health which affected his academics—he was always a poor student except when it came to art and drawing.  He was accepted into The Haarlem School of Architecture and Decorative Arts, where he studied architecture […]

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It’s Bloomsday!

In James Joyce’s Ulysses, a masterpiece of Irish Modernist literature, character Leopold Bloom spends an ordinary day—16 June 1904—walking around Dublin, going about his daily business, interacting with the people in his life, and musing on the things he encounters or observes in his travels.  The work’s title comes from the Latin adaptation of the […]

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Happy Father’s Day

“When I was a boy of 14, my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around.  But when I got to be 21, I was astonished at how much the old man had learned in seven years!”   – Mark Twain A word of thanks and a wish of […]

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More Glassware, Now In-Store

Straight out of “Mad Men,” a set of six Old-Fashioned Rocks glasses, screen printed with gold and black graphics.  Part of a new collection of glassware—now in-store—stems, liquor services, and novelty glasses like the set above. Please come into the shop to see the new shipment or click on the photo to learn more about […]

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Much New Glassware, Now in Store

In recent days, you’ve seen some photos of items found on my most recent buying trip.  I’ve begun listing some of these items on the LEO Design On-Line Shop—and will share more of them in journal posts over the next few days. Above, a Mid-Century cocktail service—for martinis or other icy cold concoctions—blown of purple-tinted […]

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A Football is Round!

Prepared or not, the Twentieth Football World Cup begins today in São Paulo, Brazil!  In the opening match (today at 4:00 pm Eastern Time), Croatia faces the host country, Brazil, in the new Arena de São Paulo—an arena so new, in fact, that it has never been tested with a capacity crowd.  And, if that […]

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On the Road – part three

Christmas . . . in June?  A bit off-season, I know, but I have to buy these cool antiques when I find them—they may not be around later.  Shown above, a wooden Christmas ornament box, from the 1940’s or 1950’s, with a printed greeting on the cover.  A bit beat-up—well-loved, perhaps—but still up to the […]

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On the Road – part two

More glassware from my trip to the Mid-West:  a set of eight “double shots” from the 1950’s with burgundy and gold banding.  Very handsome, indeed. This set—and the rest of my new-found treasures—is now in-store and ready for your perusal.  Please come into the shop and see them. Additionally, please keep checking the LEO Design […]

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On the Road – part one

I’m wrapping-up a buying trip in Western Pennsylvania and the (near) Mid-West.  I’ve found a lot of glassware, including this set of ten cut crystal champagne stems, pictured above. The crystal has just a trace of purple, found on the best glass.  It is deeply hand-cut with a stylized botanical motif on the bowls and […]

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More Father’s Day Cards

Father’s Day is one week from today.  Just enough time to buy him one of our new “Outdoorsman” cards for the holiday.  Printed on 100% cotton paper stock in Canada, these cards are masculine, understated,  straightforward—just like Dad.  $5.00 each Come into the shop to see these and our wide range of great gifts for […]

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New Cards for Father’s Day

With Father’s Day just a week away, we’re thrilled with our new shipment of Dad-appropriate greeting cards—in nautical and “outdoorsy” themes. Designed and crafted in Western Canada, they are letterpress printed on a luxurious, 100% cotton paper stock.  And, when Father’s Day is done, these cards will continue to be perfect for summer and early […]

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World Environment Day

Today is World Environment Day, a day dedicated to raising global awareness of (and encouraging action toward) protecting nature and planet Earth.  It was first celebrated in 1973 after being declared by the United Nations the previous year.  A different country hosts each year’s celebration and an annual theme is selected; this year’s host is […]

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Swedish Jugendstil

In the late 19th and early 20th Centuries, the Art Nouveau Movement swept across Scandinavia, Finland and (to a lesser extent) into Western Russia (St. Petersburg, in particular).  In architecture, it was called The National Romantic Style (or, sometimes, by the German name “Jugendstil”) and it sought to breathe new life into civic and domestic […]

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“Howl”

On this day in 1926, Irwin Allen Ginsberg was born in Newark, NJ.  Precocious, an ideologue, and facile with words, the teenaged boy would write letters to the New York Times on the hot topics of the day:  World War II and Labor issues.  At Columbia University, Allen befriended a group of like-minded men—Lucien Carr, […]

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Tarzan is Born

On this day in 1904, Peter Johann Weißmüller was born in Freidorf, then a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire (and now in Romania).  When he was seven months of age, his family moved to the U.S. and, after a period in Pennsylvania, settled in Chicago.  At nine, young Peter contracted polio, and, at the advice […]

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June’s Birthstone

The month of June is endowed with three birthstones: Pearls, Alexandrite, and Moonstone. And while pearls are not true “stones,” for millennia they have been valued for their rarity, costliness, and mysterious beauty.  Pearls are the “build-up” of calcium carbonate, produced by fresh- and saltwater mollusks, when a small foreign object enters (and irritates) the […]

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Metlach German Jugendstil

In 1748, German businessman François Boch founded a pottery workshop in the  duchy (or “dukedom”) of Lorraine, which straddled the French, German, Belgian and Luxembourg borders.  His business succeeded and soon Boch opened another factory in Luxembourg, then (in 1801) another one in the Western German village of Metlach—in a former 10th Century Benedictine abbey […]

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The Rite of Spring

The crowd rioted—on this day in 1913—at the premier performance of Igor Stravinsky’s “Le Sacre du Printemps” (The Rite of Spring) performed in Paris’s Théâtre des Champs-Élysées. Produced by Russian “Showman Extraordinaire” Sergei Diaghilev, the music proved to be a ground-breaking (and threatening) aural sensation of unconventional rhythm, nauseating dissonance, and traditional Russian folk music.  The story […]

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The “Unknown” Irving Richards

Today, Raymor is strongly identified with Italian Mid-Century Modern ceramics.  Few people realize, however, that Raymor was actually an American brand name which made products (especially ceramics) in the United States, Scandinavia, Mexico, Germany and Italy. New Yorker Irving Richards (born Rappaport), began his business life in 1926, selling used books in Manhattan.  After a […]

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Herman Kähler

In 1839, thirty-one year old Joachim Herman Kähler moved from Northern Germany to Nestved, Denmark where he opened a ceramics manufacturing workshop.  For the next thirty-or-so years, Kähler produced practical home and kitchen items, most notably an oil lamp called “the all night burner.”  In 1872, his sons, Herman August and Carl Frederick, took-over the […]

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Victoria Regina at 195

Had she lived, today would have been Queen Victoria’s 195th birthday.  She still “holds the crown” for longest-reigning British monarch (until 10 September 2015 at which point Queen Elizabeth II—should she still hold the throne—will surpass Victoria).  Victoria was quite far-down the line of succession but circumstances cleared a path for her—her father died when […]

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A Band of Gold

A band of gold surrounds the rim and “shoulder” of this eight-piece tumbler set, made in the 1940’s or 1950’s—and just received in the shop.  A taller, narrower set of eight was also just received.  Lovely for juice or water and perfect for wine—red or white. Please come into the shop to see them—and the […]

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New Glassware In-Store

A blush of rose infuses the bowls of these Modernist crystal champagne coupes, made in the 1950’s.  This set of ten is a part of a new shipment of glassware just-received in the last few days—tumblers, cordials, and lots of coupes. Please come into the shop to see the rest of the new assortment or […]

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Pearl on Mother-of-Pearl

We finish our exhibition of newly-acquired cufflinks with a simple, elegant, and classic mother-of-pearl pair.  A little “seed pearl” sits atop its  lustrous bed, and the backings are nicely gold-plated. Please come into the shop and see the rest of the new collection—most of which we do not have on-line.  Or, click on the photo […]

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“Coffered” Sterling

More from our collection of newly-acquired cufflinks:  a sterling silver pair, possibly English, decorated with an impressed, coffered grid design. Please come into the shop to see them—and the rest of our new cufflinks—or click on the photo to learn more about this pair. More cufflinks tomorrow.

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Convertible Cufflinks

These cufflinks, made in the early Twentieth Century, are made of cut, sapphire blue crystal and are set into pierced sterling silver mountings.  They are also “convertible” which means one can remove the “heads” from the center link and use the four separate pieces as shirt buttons (like studs). These are part of our new […]

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Scottish Moss Agate

The Scots are understandably proud of their native stones and use them liberally in their jewelry, crafts and other decorative objets.  The pair of cufflinks, pictured above, are part of our newest delivery of handsome, vintage cufflinks. Made in Edwardian Scotland (c. 1905), these cufflinks proudly showcase the simple yet handsome stone—with its ancient and […]

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Arts & Crafts Hammered Sterling

Our newest cufflink shipment, now in store, includes this pair of American Arts & Crafts hammered sterling ovals.  Decorated with a crisp Greek Key border, their hand-hammered silver centers gleam with a softly-diffused reflection.  These are part of a larger offering of hammered silver Arts & Crafts cufflinks.  Please come into the store or peruse […]

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More Cufflinks

We continue our introduction of newly-acquired cufflinks; now showing a pair of English mid-century turquoise set in sterling silver.  The black veining provides a handsome contrast against the saturated, otherworldly blue stones. Please come into the shop to see the full range of cufflinks—including the new shipment—or click on the photo above to learn more […]

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Viva Las Vegas!

On this day in 1905, Las Vegas was officially founded as a city. But its history began long before this date.  In pre-historic times, what we now call Las Vegas (Spanish for “The Meadows”) was a verdant marshland, replete with vegetation and animal life (including mammoths, whose remains were found in the 1990’s). In time, […]

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New, from Norway

Here is another offering from our recent acquisition of handsome cufflinks, now in-store. The pair above was made at the turn of the Twentieth Century by Marius Hammer in Bergen, Norway. Mr. Hammer made jewelry for both women and men as well as decorated boxes, spoons, and other personal accessories (like card holders, thimbles, and […]

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A New Collection of Cufflinks

A new collection of cufflinks has just flown-in, including these sterling silver owls with gemstone eyes.  Although this pair is not old—which the rest of my cufflink assortment is—I could not resist buying them!  Come into the shop to see them or call to find-out more about them.  You may also click on the photo […]

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Dante Gabriel Rossetti

On this day in 1828, Anglo-Italian painter and poet Gabriel Dante Rossetti was born in London to a Sicilian father and half-Italian mother.  As a young man, enchanted with the literature, art and culture of Medieval Italy, he rearranged the order of his name to Dante Gabriel Rossetti—an homage to the towering 13th Century poet. […]

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Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux

Sculptor extraordinaire, Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux, was born on this day in 1827, in the little French village of Valenciennes, near the Belgian border.  His father was a stone mason and the boy inherited his father’s talent for working with stone. Carpeaux is among the greatest sculptors of the Nineteenth Century, much-commissioned for Emperor Napoleon III and […]

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A New Shipment of Bookends

I’ve just received a collection of new (vintage) bookends:  elephants, horses, and dogs—like the cast iron Terriers, pictured above.  Made in the late 1920’s, they capture nicely the square muzzle, wiry coat, and the alert stance of the popular sporting dog.  They stand atop an Art Deco base and stand ready to hold-up your collection […]

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It’s Beginning to Feel a lot Like Summer!

Is it just me or is it getting warm around here?  It seems a few minutes ago we were complaining about the endless winter! Above, a newly-acquired piece:  a bronze Modernist sculpture of a male nude, pulling his shirt over his head.  One can see (faintly) the impression of his face as his knitted tee […]

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Seasonal Greetings!

We’ve just received a large shipment—dozens of styles—of new Spring and Summer greeting cards from England, New England, and California.  Please visit the shop to see all the new styles:  flora and fauna, offset and letterpress.  We have cards perfect for Mother’s Day, Weddings, and warm-weather birthdays.

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Boys’ Day

When I was a boy, growing-up in Hawaii, my father would commemorate Boys’ Day each 5 May by running two Japanese carp flags up the flagpole—a big red and white one (for me) and a smaller black and white one (for my younger brother).  Boys’ Day!  It made me feel so important!  I am (a […]

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Just In: Lustrous Champagne Coupes

We’ve just received a new collection of vintage glassware including the dozen lustrous crystal champagne coupes, pictured above.  They were made in the 1930’s or 1940’s and could add an extra splash of color to your next affair.  Please come see them in the shop or call us to learn more about them.

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Cricket Crosses the Pond

On this day in 1751, the first reported cricket match was played in America. Both the New York Gazette and the Weekly Post Boy report the match between the London and New York “sides.”  (New York won.) Three years later, Ben Franklin picked-up a copy of the rules book in London, helping to regularize the […]

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America’s First Inauguration

On this day in 1789, at about noon, a spiffy George Washington emerged from his New York City home.  He lived at One Cherry Street, near the East River.  He was dressed in a dark brown (American made!) wool suit, white silk stockings, and a dark red overcoat.  Light glinted off the shiney silver buckles […]

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L’oiseau

“The bird,” in French, is “l’oiseau”—and that is what this French Art Nouveau wine jug is sometimes called in its home country.  Made by Pierrefonds in the early Twentieth Century, it possesses the heavily-encrusted crystallization for which this ceramics workshop is well-known.  Many a French household would have served table wine in a jug like […]

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Gilbert Méténier

Gilbert Méténier was a man of artistry and principle.  He was born 30 September 1876 and worked in his father, Louis’s, stoneware workshop which had been founded in the 1880’s. These early works were rarely (if ever) marked and not much is known about their production.  In the 1920’s—probably around the time of Louis’s death—Gilbert […]

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A New Arrival of French Pottery

We’ve just received a new collection of French Art Nouveau art pottery, including the piece shown above. Made by Poterie Renault in Argent-sur-Sauldre, France, this piece perfectly captures the contradiction of the best Art Nouveau pottery—a controlled, fulsome form finished with random, dripping abandon.  Poterie Renault was founded in 1847 and continues to produce pottery […]

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America’s Great Woodsman-Artist

On this day in 1785, Jean Rabin Audubon was born on the French colony of Saint-Domingue—now called Haiti.  His father was a French naval officer who owned a sugar plantation there;  his mother was the man’s mistress.  The senior Audubon was an “active man”; the young Audubon grew-up amongst a number of half siblings of […]

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The First Lady of Song

On this day in 1917, the world was graced with the incomparably-talented Ella Fitzgerald, America’s “First Lady of Song.”  A difficult childhood (and challenging final years) could not suppress Ella’s talents—or her legacy as one of the world’s greatest vocalists. Ella was born in Newport News, Virginia but soon was moved to Yonkers, New York […]

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The “Cathedral of Commerce”

On this evening in 1913, President Woodrow Wilson flipped an electrical switch in Washington, DC, thus lighting-up the Woolworth Building in New York City.  The world’s tallest skyscraper—dubbed “The Cathedral of Commerce—was officially opened! Begun in 1910, the building was originally conceived as a 20-story office building to headquarter the F. W. Woolworth Corporation.  Three […]

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Earth Day

In the winter of 1969, Denis Hayes gave a lecture at Columbia University, seeking to establish and promote the celebration of a new “holiday,” Earth Day.  A small group of local attendees took-up his challenge and agreed to organize and lead the New York City activities.  And what a good job they did!  On this […]

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Boston Patriots

The date 19 April 1775 marks the Battles of Lexington and Concord—the first two armed conflicts which began the American Revolutionary War.  And, since 1894, Massachusetts has commemorated the day as Patriots’ Day.  Costumed re-enactments are staged at Lexington Green and Concord’s Old North Bridge. And, naturally, a mounted horseman re-traces the route of Paul […]

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A Monumental Day

Today is the International Day for Monuments and Sites, established by UNESCO in 1983. It’s a day on which humanity’s cultural diversity (and its vulnerability) is promoted, protected and conserved.  Though we often don’t think about it, monuments and cultural sites teach us the history of the world’s human experiences.  Such places transmit the values, […]

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The Canterbury Tales

It was just before sunrise on this day in 1387.  A group of religious pilgrims gathered at the Tabard Inn in Southwark (part of modern-day Central London), about to begin their four day journey.  60 miles to the west stood their destination: The Canterbury Cathedral, specifically the shrine of Saint Thomas Beckett.  Beckett, who had […]

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New Glassware in Store

Just in:  a large collection on vintage glassware—champagne coupes, liquor stems, and whiskey glasses.  Some are traditionally handsome, some have a Mid-Century edge.  Come into the shop to view the full collection or see a selection of them in our on-line store. Shown above a “Citrine” crystal decanter and glass set, finely hand-etched with a […]

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A Host of Golden Daffodils!

I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o’er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils! -William Wordsworth, 1804 On this day in 1802, English poet Willam Wordsworth and his sister, Dorothy, were enjoying a walk around Glencoyne Bay in the Lake District in […]

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Black Day

In Asia, Valentine’s Day prompts a woman to give a gift to a man.  On White Day (one month later) men return the courtesy.  In Korea, today is Black Day—and all those who were “uninvolved” or “unlucky” on the previous two holidays commiserate by eating noodles dressed with black bean sauce.  Sorry singles, both males […]

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William S. Mycock

William S. Mycock had a very long and productive career with Pilkington’s.  He began in 1894 hand-decorating tiles.  He transferred to the art pottery division in 1906 and remained there—designing and hand-decorating ceramics—until his retirement in 1938, the same year the art pottery division was shuttered. Prior to working at Pilkington’s, Mycock had studied painting […]

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More about Pilkington’s

Pilkington began an art pottery division in 1898, just in-time to enjoy the peak of the English Arts & Crafts Movement.  They contracted the talents of England’s prominent designers and had a stable of in-house artists, as well. As the new century progressed, Pilkington found itself making a splash at international design exhibitions:  in Liege […]

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Pilkington’s

Pilkington’s ceramic art pottery had a rather accidental beginning.  The four Pilkington brothers were part of a group of businessmen who, in 1889, planned to dig a coal mine in Clifton, near Manchester, England.  It turned-out that the pits being dug were water-saturated, making the intended venture impossible.  But the wet earth was suitable for […]

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More New Pottery

Shown above, more English art pottery from the 1930’s, all a part of a newly-acquired collection—now in store.  Please come in to see it or check-out our on-line shop. More about this pottery tomorrow.

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A New Collection Arrives

New in store:  a collection of quality English art pottery, glazed in shades of blue and aqua from the 1920’s and 1930’s.   Please visit the store to see it in-person or peruse our on-line shop. More about these new acquisitions over the next several days.

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Tartan Day

On this day in 1320, fifty-one Scotsmen signed The Declaration of Arbroath—a letter to Pope John XXII declaring Scottish independence and their intention to use military force, if necessary, to protect Scotland from invasion.  Nearly seven hundred years later, 6 April has been declared Tartan Day in Canada and the United States—a day to celebrate […]

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The Pony Express

On this day in 1860, the Pony Express began its first day of service, linking St. Joseph, Missouri to the new (and important) state of California.  A customer paid $5.00 per half-ounce to have his envelope whisked along the 1900 mile route in an astonishing 10 days.  A company of 120 riders (each weighing less […]

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Resting in Peace

In 2005, British Arts & Crafts collector Edward Smith decided he’d like to combine his two loves—his family’s (retired) Sussex, England farmland and his collection of Arts & Crafts pottery, metalwork, textiles and furniture.  In a clearing amongst the trees on his property, Smith has been creating a cemetery expressly for the remains of notable […]

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Out Damned Spots!

The Massachusetts Bay Colony, established by the Massachusetts Bay Company, was settled in the area surrounding (and between) present day Boston and Salem.   The Company was strictly Puritan, and there was no separation of Church and Company, let alone Church and State.  Most of the 20,000-or-so settlers were immigrants from England and their crossing […]

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Truant’s Day ?

In some years, today’s the first day of Spring.  In Poland, students celebrate the day by—skipping school?  Yes, it’s Truant’s Day! The little boy, pictured above, may or may not be missing class.  He was sculpted by a Polish artist however, Vaclav Szczeblewski.  And whether Mr. Szczeblewski ever skipped school, I can’t say.  Apparently, he […]

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The Master Playwright

Henrik Ibsen is considered by some the greatest playwright since Shakespeare.  He is called “The Father of (Theatrical) Modernism” by others.  His great plays include “Hedda Gabbler,” “Peer Gynt,” “A Doll’s House,” and “An Enemy of the People.”  He was born and died in his home country of Norway (1828-1906), and was captured in the […]

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The Wearing of the Green

Saint Pádraig, the patron saint of Ireland, was from a Roman-era British family, born in 385 AD.  His father was a deacon and his grandfather a priest.  At sixteen, Patrick was kidnapped and shipped as a slave to Ireland.  In a dream, he recounts, God instructed him to escape and head for the coast where […]

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Beware the Ides of March

In the ancient Roman calendar, the “Ides” were the mid-point in a month—either the 13th or 15th, depending on the length of that particular month.  Each month’s Ides were celebrated in honor of Rome’s top deity, Jupiter, and a “scapegoat” was paraded and sacrificed to that god. The Ides of March—15 March—was extra-special since March […]

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Gouda Art Pottery

Gouda is a small city in Holland, settled in the marshy lands east of The Hague.  In the past, the area’s moist terrain was perfect for harvesting peat which was used as fuel for cooking, heating, and combustion.  The area’s wetlands were also a rich source of clay.  The ready supply of clay—plus fuel to […]

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